Digital Kungfu

Talking Tech

3 reasons why technology companies should stop talking tech, and start talking to customers

Focusing too much on tech jargon isn’t a unique problem. It’s one that technology businesses around the world share, whether they’re large or small, established or startups. In our experience, the reasons behind this are simple.

Tech companies offer large and complex solutions to key business challenges and needs, and they feel they have to unpack those solutions to show the full value of their offerings. Complex solutions are couched in complex jargon though, and the result is messaging that doesn’t speak to client needs, even if the solutions do.

If you want to capture your target market’s attention, you need to speak in a language that resonates with them. You need to stop talking tech, and start speaking ‘human’. Here’s how to get started.

1. Ditch the jargon.

Incomprehensible jargon is the hallmark of a profession. By definition, jargon defines special words that are industry-specific.

What many companies forget is that your industry services a customer who is not a member of your industry – they need your solutions, but they are not actually part of your sector. Why then are you speaking to them in your industry-specific jargon? You’re putting a lot of pressure on customers to understand your jargon, figure out how it relates to their workspace and challenges, and then to remember it.

What you should be doing:  There are important ideas behind jargon that customers need to get to grips with. Firewall is a great example in the technology space. Most non-technology customers have a vague idea what a firewall is and does – they know the term, but they don’t actually understand what it means – and so they tend to dismiss it a bit – even if they only do so subconsciously. When this happens, your customer misses the vital point that a firewall is a network security system designed to prevent unauthorised access to or from a private network.

If you want to connect with your customer, you need to make the ideas behind jargon sticky and memorable, and the way to achieve that is through a simple story. You need to make Firewalls understandable and relatable. What they are called is irrelevant to your customer – what they can do for them, is not.  

2. Make your customer the hero of the story.

Talking tech to customers is the equivalent of walking into a bar, spotting a gorgeous guy or lady, walking up to them and then only talking about yourself, dropping acronym after acronym: “I work in IaaS, SaaS and PaaS as a TOS and RTB and as a Cloud architecture technician.” It wouldn’t work in the world of dating, so why do businesses think it works in the world of marketing?

What you should be doing: You should have three goals. First, you want your customers to understand what you do – not through industry-specific jargon, but instead through what your solutions look like inside their businesses. What are the end results? Second, you want your customers to understand that you know them – you understand their pain like no one else. The only way to achieve this is by talking about them; making them the hero of the story – not you or your business. Three, you want them to respond to your messaging and take action. This means your messaging needs to be relevant to them and they should want to learn more.

3. Start with business outcomes, then move to solutions.

Being great at tech isn’t the same as being great at communicating what you do. In fact, it’s often the reason why technology companies actually struggle to succinctly communicate what it is that they do.

Technology businesses develop and implement complex solutions for complex problems. Their messaging tends to be in-depth and complex as a result, because that’s the world they play in. There is so much to say about a single technology product or service and it’s all important, so marketing messages try to say everything, and as a result fail to land anything.

What you should be doing: Instead of focusing on your solutions (which are complex), focus instead on the business outcome that your solution creates for your customers, because that’s what they understand, and more importantly, what they care about. Place your customer at the centre of the story – they are your heroes. Tell your story from their perspective, and you’ll create messaging that resonates with your audience.

Once you’ve landed that initial messaging, then context becomes important. For example, when you’re talking about storing sensitive payroll information on a Cloud ERP system, it is important how secure the data is. You do need to communicate what security authentication you use and what data backup and recovery measures are in place. The how is important. The key here though is that you can only discuss the how once you’ve established the why – and that lies in your customer’s story, and not your own.

In the news

Digital Kungfu - Expands into the UK

After generating sales qualified leads in excess of £12 million in under 12 months for its clients in Africa, Digital Kungfu is launching in the UK.

Related Posts

Newsletter

Subscribe for our monthly newsletter to stay updated

3. Start with business outcomes, then move to solutions.

Being great at tech isn’t the same as being great at communicating what you do. In fact, it’s often the reason why technology companies actually struggle to succinctly communicate what it is that they do.

Technology businesses develop and implement complex solutions for complex problems. Their messaging tends to be in-depth and complex as a result, because that’s the world they play in. There is so much to say about a single technology product or service and it’s all important, so marketing messages try to say everything, and as a result fail to land anything.

What you should be doing: Instead of focusing on your solutions (which are complex), focus instead on the business outcome that your solution creates for your customers, because that’s what they understand, and more importantly, what they care about. Place your customer at the centre of the story – they are your heroes. Tell your story from their perspective, and you’ll create messaging that resonates with your audience.

Digital Kungfu - 3 reasons why technology companies should stop talking tech, and start talking to customers

Once you’ve landed that initial messaging, then context becomes important. For example, when you’re talking about storing sensitive payroll information on a Cloud ERP system, it is important how secure the data is. You do need to communicate what security authentication you use and what data backup and recovery measures are in place. The how is important. The key here though is that you can only discuss the how once you’ve established the why – and that lies in your customer’s story, and not your own.

Campaign in mind?

Our Ninjas are ready and waiting to welcome you to the dojo as we deploy a solution that solves your lead generation challenges.